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Archaeology and Architecture
in the Center of Rome

Revival of the Sallustiano District

An example of the recovery and reuse of antiquity, the archaeological complex of Piazza Sallustio and the buildings above it constitute a significant architecture typical of the entire Sallustian quarter, from the ancient topographical situation-with the first Horti belonging to Julius Caesar and later enlarged by Sallust and Hadrian-to the abandonment of the area throughout the Middle Ages, to the formation of the villas of the Renaissance and Baroque periods and the buildings of the modern quarter that arose after the establishment of Rome as the capital city.

Archaeology and Architecture in the Center of Rome

Revival of the Sallustiano District

An example of the recovery and reuse of antiquity, the archaeological complex of Piazza Sallustio and the buildings above it constitute a significant architecture typical of the entire Sallustian quarter, from the ancient topographical situation-with the first Horti belonging to Julius Caesar and later enlarged by Sallust and Hadrian-to the abandonment of the area throughout the Middle Ages, to the formation of the villas of the Renaissance and Baroque periods and the buildings of the modern quarter that arose after the establishment of Rome as the capital city.

The Underground Building of Piazza Sallustio

Rediscovery and revelations of ancient Rome

The building, located about 15 m below the present square, reports to the level of the ancient city. Divided into three building bodies, the main and central part of the complex, considerably advanced compared to the two side bodies, consists of a large circular hall covered with a “shell” vault.

The Underground Building of Piazza Sallustio

Rediscovery and revelations of ancient Rome

The building, located about 15 m below the present square, reports to the level of the ancient city. Divided into three building bodies, the main and central part of the complex, considerably advanced compared to the two side bodies, consists of a large circular hall covered with a “shell” vault.

Archaeology and Architecture
in the Center of Rome

Underground Architecture

Bracket holes visible at the base of the niches suggest that they were externally decorated with small columns that supported tympanums or other architectural elements. In the center of the modern “cocciopesto” floor, which re-proposes the modular pattern of the original floor, a glass-protected opening allows examination of part of the hall’s foundation. The rearmost part, with a semicircular floor plan, consists of a multi-story building, an insula of the stately type, home of the staff and various workers, with distinct frescoed, mosaic-floored, windowed rooms. On the northern side of the central body, a wide staircase, now visible only from inside the atrium, led to upper rooms of the villa that no longer exist.

Archaeology and Architecture in the Center of Rome

Underground Architecture

Bracket holes visible at the base of the niches suggest that they were externally decorated with small columns that supported tympanums or other architectural elements. In the center of the modern “cocciopesto” floor, which re-proposes the modular pattern of the original floor, a glass-protected opening allows examination of part of the hall’s foundation. The rearmost part, with a semicircular floor plan, consists of a multi-story building, an insula of the stately type, home of the staff and various workers, with distinct frescoed, mosaic-floored, windowed rooms. On the northern side of the central body, a wide staircase, now visible only from inside the atrium, led to upper rooms of the villa that no longer exist.

The urban Horti

The Horti Sallustiani were not only places of relaxation and leisure but also centers of power and entertainment for the Roman aristocratic class.

The term ‘horti’  was used by the Romans of the imperial period to refer to villas and parks located within the city, built in the manner of pleasure residences. In the 2nd century BC, the distinction was introduced between the rustic villa, located in the countryside or suburbs (villa), and the city garden, generally referred to as ‘horti’.

Recovery and Accessibility
with Respect for the Past

Revival of the
Aula Adrianea

In 1998, the project for the recovery of the Aula Adrianea was approved by the Superintendence, which included the restoration of the ancient structure to which it was desired to give a new use, so as to return the complex to public use. It was therefore decided that the structure was suitable for hosting activities of a conference and cultural nature, equipping the environment with modern systems of plant engineering, from lighting to air conditioning and heating, to toilets, all of course in the most complete respect for the ancient masonry.

Recovery and Accessibility with Respect for the Past

Revival of the Aula Adrianea

In 1998, the project for the recovery of the Aula Adrianea was approved by the Superintendence, which included the restoration of the ancient structure to which it was desired to give a new use, so as to return the complex to public use. It was therefore decided that the structure was suitable for hosting activities of a conference and cultural nature, equipping the environment with modern systems of plant engineering, from lighting to air conditioning and heating, to toilets, all of course in the most complete respect for the ancient masonry.

In 2020, a new project further improved the accessibility of the Aula Adrianea, especially for people with disabilities.

The Superintendence approved the adaptation of the complex with the addition of ramps, tactile plaques, and an elevator, maintaining respect for the pre-existing historical and architectural context.

Recensioni

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